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Bar Height Kitchen Island

Bar Height Kitchen Island

2 × Size, Placement and Storage Size, Placement and Storage Illustration by Duo Dickinson Shoehorning an island into a kitchen that’s too small is a mistake. Here are the minimum clearances the author uses between islands and cabinets, as well as minimum sizes for islands with different uses. Remember, these are minimums; it’s better to be more generous if your floor plan allows. Size and Placement Kitchen islands suck space. At minimum, an island should be 4 feet long and a little more than 2 feet deep, but it must also have room for people to move and work around it. Unless your kitchen is at least 8 feet deep and more than 12 feet long, don’t even think about an island. (For more on practical dimensions for islands and the minimum space around them, see “Island Minimums,” above.) Storage Needs You can gain valuable real estate on both the “working” side and the “public” side of an island for storage, always a critical need in kitchens. On the public side, take advantage of shallow cabinets (installed back-to-back, with deeper cabinets facing the kitchen) for serving items—napkins, cutlery, platters, etc.—that don’t need to be in the food prep area. On the working side, make sure there’s room to store the things that are needed for the activity the island supports, because an island’s strong suit is also its biggest downfall: It’s isolated. If it’s a cooking island, then pots, pans, and spices should be at hand. The space under cooktops is great for deep drawers for pots and pans. (The temptation is to hang them from an expensive pot rack, which won’t hold deeper pots or lids and gets in the way of your view.) If it’s a prep island, don’t forget storage for knives and small appliances like mixers and food processors (consider pop-ups — platforms that swing out from behind a door in the island base—or appliance garages for these), and convenient access to garbage and compost bins. If the island is going to be dedicated to cleanup, you’ll need a place for dish towels, detergent, and brushes. Undercounter storage space is limited on islands that include a sink and/or major appliances like a dishwasher or oven; you’ll have to plan more carefully for those. The same is true for cooktops with downdraft fans, the machinery for which must be stored in the cabinet below. One way around this is to use the ends of the island. Round ends are perfect for lazy Susans, and almost any island end can accommodate open shelving or even a shallow cabinet.
bar height kitchen island 1

Bar Height Kitchen Island

Size, Placement and Storage Illustration by Duo Dickinson Shoehorning an island into a kitchen that’s too small is a mistake. Here are the minimum clearances the author uses between islands and cabinets, as well as minimum sizes for islands with different uses. Remember, these are minimums; it’s better to be more generous if your floor plan allows. Size and Placement Kitchen islands suck space. At minimum, an island should be 4 feet long and a little more than 2 feet deep, but it must also have room for people to move and work around it. Unless your kitchen is at least 8 feet deep and more than 12 feet long, don’t even think about an island. (For more on practical dimensions for islands and the minimum space around them, see “Island Minimums,” above.) Storage Needs You can gain valuable real estate on both the “working” side and the “public” side of an island for storage, always a critical need in kitchens. On the public side, take advantage of shallow cabinets (installed back-to-back, with deeper cabinets facing the kitchen) for serving items—napkins, cutlery, platters, etc.—that don’t need to be in the food prep area. On the working side, make sure there’s room to store the things that are needed for the activity the island supports, because an island’s strong suit is also its biggest downfall: It’s isolated. If it’s a cooking island, then pots, pans, and spices should be at hand. The space under cooktops is great for deep drawers for pots and pans. (The temptation is to hang them from an expensive pot rack, which won’t hold deeper pots or lids and gets in the way of your view.) If it’s a prep island, don’t forget storage for knives and small appliances like mixers and food processors (consider pop-ups — platforms that swing out from behind a door in the island base—or appliance garages for these), and convenient access to garbage and compost bins. If the island is going to be dedicated to cleanup, you’ll need a place for dish towels, detergent, and brushes. Undercounter storage space is limited on islands that include a sink and/or major appliances like a dishwasher or oven; you’ll have to plan more carefully for those. The same is true for cooktops with downdraft fans, the machinery for which must be stored in the cabinet below. One way around this is to use the ends of the island. Round ends are perfect for lazy Susans, and almost any island end can accommodate open shelving or even a shallow cabinet.
bar height kitchen island 2

Bar Height Kitchen Island

Today is another peek into the home we’re remodeling with a design dilemma we will be tackling soon, this one is the debate between counter and bar height for the kitchen peninsula. This ledge is more of a stuff collector than practical dining surface, a dinner plate doesn’t even fit but I imagine it was designed to be that way on purpose in the original plan. I do get the ‘divide the spaces’ look achieved with the bar height in this kitchen which looks out into the shared family room and breakfast nook space, but the narrowness of the wood shelf on top is odd to me. And say hello to the lovely vinyl wallpaper I have the pleasure of removing later this month. And then there’s the sink nestled in the angle which I can’t even think about moving (the cost! the headache!) since all the plumbing to the dishwasher and sink is inside this pony wall and we’re working with a slab foundation. I’m not a fan of the layout of this kitchen, I am a U shaped kitchen lover and this one isn’t like that at all. But since we do plan to replace the cabinets/counters/sink down the road I think that will satisfy so I’m going to work with the footprint as is. (That tile/carpet combo is also leaving this month, more on that soon.) So it raises the question of keeping the higher breakfast bar as it is now but extending that upper surface with new countertops and corbels, or do we cut down the wall and extend a new countertop out in a single plane as one large surface to unify it all at counter height (my preference). At first I was concerned about the sink if we cut down the wall thinking “there will be the splashing of the water everywhere!” but I realized plenty of well designed kitchens have islands or peninsulas with sinks at counter height. john maniscalo architecture teddy edwards texas construction company summerhouse interior design better homes & gardens mountain cabinetry gaylord design better homes & gardens The reason I lean toward the counter height option is it feels more open to the adjoining space, but then again I see the appeal of the division and raised countertop paired with bar stools. grey crawford bhg via hooked on houses taylor brian construction sarah richardson christophers of nantucket exquisite kitchen design Both options allow for conversation between cook and family/guests and I plan to suspend some pretty pendants above. What’s your preference in your home’s island or peninsula, counter height or divided height with bar stools? .. .
bar height kitchen island 3

Bar Height Kitchen Island

Size and Placement Kitchen islands suck space. At minimum, an island should be 4 feet long and a little more than 2 feet deep, but it must also have room for people to move and work around it. Unless your kitchen is at least 8 feet deep and more than 12 feet long, don’t even think about an island. (For more on practical dimensions for islands and the minimum space around them, see “Island Minimums,” above.) Storage Needs You can gain valuable real estate on both the “working” side and the “public” side of an island for storage, always a critical need in kitchens. On the public side, take advantage of shallow cabinets (installed back-to-back, with deeper cabinets facing the kitchen) for serving items—napkins, cutlery, platters, etc.—that don’t need to be in the food prep area. On the working side, make sure there’s room to store the things that are needed for the activity the island supports, because an island’s strong suit is also its biggest downfall: It’s isolated. If it’s a cooking island, then pots, pans, and spices should be at hand. The space under cooktops is great for deep drawers for pots and pans. (The temptation is to hang them from an expensive pot rack, which won’t hold deeper pots or lids and gets in the way of your view.) If it’s a prep island, don’t forget storage for knives and small appliances like mixers and food processors (consider pop-ups — platforms that swing out from behind a door in the island base—or appliance garages for these), and convenient access to garbage and compost bins. If the island is going to be dedicated to cleanup, you’ll need a place for dish towels, detergent, and brushes. Undercounter storage space is limited on islands that include a sink and/or major appliances like a dishwasher or oven; you’ll have to plan more carefully for those. The same is true for cooktops with downdraft fans, the machinery for which must be stored in the cabinet below. One way around this is to use the ends of the island. Round ends are perfect for lazy Susans, and almost any island end can accommodate open shelving or even a shallow cabinet.

Bar Height Kitchen Island

Bar Height Kitchen Island
Bar Height Kitchen Island
Bar Height Kitchen Island

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